The Sea Cloud

An illustration from my upcoming story, City of the Worm King. Up in the bow, you can see probably the best picture we’ll ever get of the traveler’s face. He doesn’t like for people to remember who he is, and I’ll respect that wish of his.

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The Crown of Fingers, Itself

The Crown of Fingers. I wouldn’t really want to look in there directly. I mean, sure, it’ll make you mighty, but I’m not sure might is all that worth it.

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The Face of Ashu

The face of Ashu, worn by Umet, high priestess of the People of the River Ashug in the central temple of the City of Ku.

When you put on a mask, do you act like yourself? Or do you act like what the mask represents?
Or does that mask act like you?

Want to know what she looks like at her best? You should definitely read Adabi and the Crown of Fingers!

You should also check out The Fifth World, an optimistic, Solarpunk, post-civilization shared world setting with an RPG, fiction, and art!

The only Solarpunk RPG I've ever seen.

Adabi and the Crown of Fingers, Part 2

Adabi laid down the maggoty bread at Bi’s feet. “Please, eat your fill. The earthen-beings behind will not suspect you, and those of air and light ahead will have other concerns.”

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Adabi and the Crown of Fingers, Part I

Adabi’s feet rested on the saxboard of the river boat, Thirsty for the Sea, as she tied a knot in an end of one of the boat’s lines. In her linen-draped lap lay a worn cedar box, its top the span of a large hand, tied on with simple twine. The boat’s owner, now paddling at the stern of the eye-prowed vessel, watched her with curiosity while his son, a boy of nine named Kaal, watched Adabi’s hands. The boy’s head was shaved where his father’s was close-cropped and black, spattered with grey at the temples. His skin like his father’s: dark as a cloudless desert night sky, and marked with gold stars, as was the tradition of his people when they ventured across land and sea. Kaal watched her nimble fingers with his warm brown eyes as she finished the elaborate knot, then whispered to it. He reached out his hand in curiosity and Adabi let him take it from her calloused fingers.

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What Is The Bloody-Handed Name of Bronze?

The Bloody-Handed Name of Bronze is a highly social roleplaying game for creating stories of passions and desire; a little like Conan and a little like The Illiad; a little like Dying Earth and a little like Torah or the Epic of Gilgamesh from the Enuma Elish. You can play it with two, three, or four players. It takes about a half hour per player, so a four person game will be about two hours.  You can keep playing, of course! Take your companions on further adventures and see what destiny their lives hold for them!

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Adabi

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Ashu, the Ibis of Dawn, Healer of the Sun

Ashu, the Ibis of Dawn, lives in the marshes beside the river Shugal. Each morning, her wings embrace the sunrise that she might guide it across the sky, for the strong right eye of the river Shugal is blind, and may only open with her aid; if she is absent, the strong right eye will close and cast the city and its farms into darkness. Continue reading “Ashu, the Ibis of Dawn, Healer of the Sun”

Mountain-That-Walks and his Student, Chalk Woman

A Year ago, the village of Pa woke to a site none had ever seen. Arriving with the rising sun was the enormous beast they called Mountain-That-Walks. Clinging to its gold-adorned fur was a stranger coated in white clay who would only call herself Chalk Woman.

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Zikru the Poet, Whose Tongue Shamed Ashlala

Zikru was once a beautiful man, a poet of great skill. So great was his ability with his tongue that he never slept alone, and often with the chiefs of his tribe. But, drunk one night on a subtle wine, he boasted that his knowledge of the Language of Names was greater even than that of Ashlala, the Great Name of the People of the River Uklal.

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